The Omega Constellation Calibre 751 Collection


The Omega Constellation calibre 751 collection was powered by the last great series of high-value movements manufactured by Omega before the onset of the Swiss Crisis of the mid-1970s. The day-date calibre 751 can trace its origins back to the famous chronometer calibre 551 and is every bit as good as its mid-500 calibre siblings. And judging by the number of enquiries I receive about these Omega Constellation models, interest in collecting them is increasing.

As the prices of calibre 551, 561 and 564 Constellations, particularly Pie Pan models, continues to rise, new and often younger collectors are entering the field and taking a shine to the calibre 751 Constellation collection. These models represent an affordable entry point into the world of collecting chronometer grade watches.

An essay surveying all the Constellation calibre 751 models can be found here

62 comments:

  1. Hi! I'm interested in ur Omega Constellation Calibre 751. Is it for sale? If yes, please send price detail to: jayleong18281@hotmail.com.

    Thanks & best regards,

    Jay Leong

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sorry I have no watches for sale at the moment
    Regards

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi, I just mailed you somewhere, now found this comments page so here goes again. Is is possible to have an authentic Constellation 751 in 14ct solid gold that does not have the observatory & stars but does have a totally plain gold back to the case. I found it listed on eBay, movement No: 23,029,475, case No: 168.029. It is "C" shaped with a knurled bezel, the dial "T Swiss Made T".

    ReplyDelete
  4. Additional information I forgot to include in previous mail. The 751 also has a silver dial with day/date. Also, it is eBay Item no: 150463870958. Just had a reply from seller as to why it has a plain gold back:-
    "hi yes thats why it is very rare made for the american market and some europearn countrys . how many 14ct ones have you seen exactly the same......none! I have only seen plain gold backs on Seamasters I think. Very interested in your comments.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Clive,

    The markings on the inner case back of this watch appear correct.

    Rather than this being a 'rare' example, and it always amazes me how loosely and self-servingly this term is used, this is most likely a "presentation" case back. In the 60's Omega offered this service to companies, etc., as it was a tradition in many parts of the world to give gold watches for long service, a tradition, sadly, no longer observed.

    So "rare" it aint. It is rubbish that this was "made for the American market and some European countries" - it was available to all on special order.

    Now the real question is, "Is the watch collectible?" I would argue that it is significantly less collectible that a C-Shape that show the observatory medallion.

    Hope that helps

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks Desmond, very helpful. Great website. It has given me invaluable information on which to base my decision to buy Constellations. Bought recently an 18ct solid gold 'C' shaped 1966 Cal.561 ( not over 1). It is 100% authentic, never refinished but as good as the day manufactured. Got it at a great price, just GBP £800 and only required a service. I am fortunate to have the services of an Omega trained watchmaker who overhauls anything I purchase.

    ReplyDelete
  7. very tidy pickup Clive

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hello Desmond,

    First, thank you for this resource. I am a new collector, and used your website as a platform for gaining knowledge to buy. With that knowledge I purchased an Omega Constellation Cal. 751. But the more I look at it, the more doubts I now have that it may not be authentic. I noticed (today) that the case number reads S.F. 168.019. What is S.F.? I see no record of it. And secondly, the watch, from the pictures, appears to missing the mirror finish. Otherwise everything seems to be in order. Will you take a look? You can find it on ebay. Here is the link: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=250678726420&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT#ht_6980wt_1139. The item number (if that doesn't work) is as follows: 250678726420.
    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Seth,

    SF is a case makers mark. The dial is correct and original, and an excellent example of a well preserved silky guilloche dial, the movement is very clean and generally this is a nice piece.

    The original finish of the case is still mainly there and the chamfer on the case edge is observable. generally it isnt a bad buy at all.

    I think you got value for money

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Desmond,

    I'm so glad that I had found your website. I have a Omega watch that is exactly the same as the picture in your blogpost.

    This watch was given to me by my father and how can I find out if it is a real Omega watch? BTW, this watch was given to my dad from a friend.

    Kenny

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Kenny

    Best way to authenticate is the have the case back opened and take a pic of movement, caseback and also the dial.

    Click on about me - and send me the pics and I'll take a look.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  12. HI Desmond,
    We chatted once on watchuseek forum for my stainless steel constelation connie, I just came across one more which has a 751 movement with a 168.016 case however the dial is quite damaged and my search for a new dial for it seems quite frustrating. I have tried otto frei, AG thomas and ebay and surfing the net still could not find one. I was wandering if you could help me by recommending a few sites which could have it instead.

    Sincerely,
    Eric aka thepoetboy(WUS)
    thepoetboy@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. Ive seen a couple around Eric. Gisbert Joseph had one and if you click on the Watchco link on rh side of blog, you may wish to email them and ask if they either have one available or know how to source one.

    Good luck

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  14. hello!
    i have an omega constellation
    its a 168019
    probably in white gold.
    the caseback has 18k 0.750



    http://img828.imageshack.us/i/dsc04111a.jpg/

    http://img25.imageshack.us/i/dsc04094om.jpg/

    http://img832.imageshack.us/i/dsc04070z.jpg/

    http://img263.imageshack.us/i/dsc04095aj.jpg/

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi,

    Yes, looking at the case back your watch is 18k white gold. It has a beautiful "silky guilloche" dial and the movement is looking very clean.

    18k white gold versions of this model are less common than the gold and rose gold models.

    A very nice watch!

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would like to send you a picture of an Omega Constellation 18K Yellow Gold including watch band circa late 60s-1970 men's watch. I have the box. I would like to know its value. It was my father's watch. My Mother bought it new. It seems to be in excellent condition compared to the pictures I have seen of similar watches. I would consider selling it but that is not my goal.

      Delete
    2. Feel free to open a post on this blohg with your email. I will not publish it. Happy to have a look at some pics.

      Cheers

      Desmond

      Delete
  16. thank you very much dear Desmond!
    i made a thread here

    http://forums.watchuseek.com/f20/omega-constellation-168-019-any-info-many-pics-inside-493538-post3618548.html#post3618548

    best
    Giorgos

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi,
    Thanks for a great blog and resource. I inherited one of the famous BA168.023 ‘Golden” Seamasters in solid 18K Gold. There is very little information about the watch other than the often mentioned, less than 1,000 produced, and its rarity. I know this is not an appraisal service but I was wondering if you or a reader can point me in the right direction to determine an approximate current value for this Omega. I have Emailed you too.
    Thanks and Regards,
    Arnold H,
    Houston, Tx., USA

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have written in he past. I have a 551 14k Constellation serial 167005.
    The Dial was sent out for refinishing and was lost. I have spent all sorts of time looking to replace it but haven't been able to. The dial measures 29.35mm. Can you do or tell me anything to help me.
    Thank you.
    David

    ReplyDelete
  19. David, your only option is patience I'm afraid. Sometimes a dial and movement will crop up on eBay afterbeing separated for gold melting and sometimes a poor 167.005 will surface and sell cheaply

    Those are the only two options I believe, apart from the very rare occasion one sees a NOS dial surface

    Good luck in your search

    Cheers
    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi
    I have just bought a
    Omega Constellation 751

    ST 168.0019 ( I think )

    Can you tell me how the case was originaly finished?
    Mine is all polished I wondered if the sides or top should be brushed?

    [url]http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj288/neilo65/Breitling/86b68fe5.jpg[/url]

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Neil,

    Have a look at the essays under Good Buys and click on the one about the C-Shape. Details of finish are in the essay.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi THank for your quick answer yes reading the PDFs now thanks.

    Also the case back number is

    S.F 168.019
    but I can find only
    S.T 168.0019 on Omega Vintage Database?

    Have you heard of S.F on case backs?

    http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj288/neilo65/Breitling/7cbff109.jpg

    Cheers
    Neil

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Neil

    The extra 0 has been added to comply with Omegas internal electronic record keeping. So casse back 168.019 equals 0019 on the database.

    Re SF, it is a case makers mark but I cant recall which maker.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  24. Desmond, I ran across a version in a small shoppe in Nuremberg and the Days were in German. Is this a version that existed and if so more or less collectable than in English?
    Many Thanks in advance,
    Craig

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi Craig,

    Yes this is normal for German market Constellations. Most collectible in Germany and German-speaking parts of Europe, perhaps a little less collectible in English-speaking countries.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  26. Sir


    In view of your in-dept knowledge, regarding vintage Omega watches, I am surprised, you do not have a section,exclusively selling vintage Omega watches.

    Thanks.


    seamonster

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've thought of perhaps offering an authentication service and links to authentic examples, but this is a hobby that can only consume so much of my time.

      As a hobbyist, it would somehow detract from the credibility of the site, I feel, if I became a seller too....and of course it would certainly bite into the time I allocate to enjoy the experience of researching, writing and collecting vintage OMegas.

      Maybe I'll reconsider when I retire :)

      Delete
  27. Sir


    Thanks for your response.

    Am I right to suggest that the quality of an Omega movement (pre-1983) is close to that of a Patek Philippe, in general? However, the price of Omega is only a fraction, relative to Patek Philippe's.

    How did Omega achieve this and yet, Rolex outsells Omega in terms of quantity, sold?



    Thank-you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patek movements are hand finished with a high degree of decoration on the plates and also on operational parts such as regulators. Also the manufacture of hands and dials demands perhaps more craftmanship.

      Omega movements up to calibre 751 were of course a production series movement and while there was much handling and hand finishing (30% of its workforce was involved in quality) the degree of human handling was much less than in a Patek. Rolex and Omega are about the same 'quality' and then pricing differentiates today, but in the 60s and 70s Omega was priced higher than equivalent Rolexes generally. Omega in those days was considered the better watch as sales and COSC numbers (the 60s equivalent of COSC actually) of Omega chronometers attest.

      There are many variables to consider when comparing Omega to Patek, but the ones that count such as true quality (finishing where it counts on pivots, teeth and bridges; quality of metals; horological design; robustness; and most certainly precision and accuracy) there isn't much difference at all between a 60s Patek and an Omega.

      Delete
  28. Anonymous11:34 pm

    Hi Des. I just purchased a cal.751 in a steel C shaped case. Condition is beautiful. Dial is the silver colored silky guilloche finish. Were any of these dials ever made in gold for the steel cased models? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi,

    Firstly, congrats on your acquisition.

    Simple answer is no. These guilloche dials followed the case metal. Ive seen a few solid yellow dials around (probably through some heretic scrapping the case for gold value) and have been temped to buy and swap, but, then, the compromise is to lose factory originality.

    A white gold dial would be rare in itself though as few white gold ensembles were made.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  30. Anonymous6:26 am

    I need your help, i have this model, received as gift from my father. Since long time did not work anymore, I would like to know where can I repair it. I am living in Germany, therefore to send it to Switzerland is not a problem at all. Can you recommend me some place in Switzerland or Germany or Europe?

    Thanks!

    Arturo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One idea would be to take the watch to an official Omega service agent in Germany. Agents will usually send vintage watches to Omega in Bienne to be repaired and restored. This is quite expensive.

      The other option would be to take the watch to a reputable watchmaker in your city/town who has worked with Omegas over a long period and ask him to quote you on repair/restoration.

      Hope that helps.

      Cheers

      Desmond

      Delete
  31. Anonymous4:10 am

    Hi Desmond! i'm an inexperienced Omega enthusiast! i've passed my last 2 months reading your wonderful website then i've decided to buy an Omega constellation. I'm afraid to have purchased what you call a frankenwatch....can you help me???? can I send you some images ? arms and bezel are different from the image published on your article.....the model i've choosed is a
    Constellation day-date
    Cal 751
    Ref.168.029
    Case. Stainless steel
    Knurled bezel with silky guilloche dial
    I hope you would help me.
    Thank for sharing all your experience with all Omega enthusiasts

    Aron-Italy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Aron,

      I'm currently travelling in Italy until mid April and am accessing emails infrequently.

      You could click on my profile and then on the email tab to send some pics. I cant guarantee when I will be able to look at them, but if you are willing to wait then please send them

      Cheers

      Desmond

      Delete
  32. Hello Desmond,

    I have bought an original 751 168.045-368.845 steel Constellation.
    It is great to find all the information on your website, and so clearly explained. ;-)
    My watch has a Dutch daywheel and that really made me tick.
    It seems hard to find how many watches where made with different language wheels.
    would you have any idea how many of the 168.045-368.845 were made with a Dutch daywheel?

    with kindest regards,

    Guido

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Guido,

      Thanks for your comments. In regards to how many pieces with Dutch day wheels, Omega doesn't have records that would reveal that information. But, with a little speculation we could have a 'stab'.

      Population of Holland in the late Sixties was around 12 million - about the same as Australia - small when compared with big markets. Europe was still recovering from WW2 and Dutch migration was still significant, so disposable income was not in plentiful supply, particularly for luxury watches. There may have also been some preference in Holland - being such an 'international' country - for day wheels in English. So I would expect, taking everything into consideration, that possibly no more than 500 pieces with Dutch day wheels would have found their way to the Netherlands.

      Regards

      Desmond

      Delete
  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Hello desmond,

    finally got the time to get a small video up of my 168.045 Constellation. I thoguth you might enjoy it. Thanks for all the information!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfg4LzTNau8&feature=youtu.be

    regards,

    Guido

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent! I saw the one on the maroon Geneve too.

      Regards

      Desmond

      Delete
  35. Clive Muzzelle8:36 am

    Hi Desmond
    I have the same model 751 as Guido but mine has day/date in Spanish. Were they low production too?
    Clive

    ReplyDelete
  36. Hi Clive,

    Lower production that those in English, but, still, they were exported to quite a few Spanish speaking countries.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  37. Anonymous4:21 am

    Hi Desmond, Is this watch a good buy? Regards / Paul
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/221410618338?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For the price it went for, I would say that it was a good buy when considering 2014 values. A whole lot of watch for the money.

      Cheers

      Desmond

      Delete
  38. Anonymous6:59 pm

    Thank you Desmond, after contacting the owner in USA/LA, I had the impression this is a good buy, so I bought the watch. You made my day with your positive review...
    paul

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hi Desmond, this is the second watch ( ref. CD 168.016 and ref. CD 168.017) without the typical "stars in the air". Do you have any explanation?
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Omega-Constellation-mens-wristwatch-steel-screw-cap-32-5-mm-in-diameter-/321400145644?pt=Wristwatches&hash=item4ad4f106ec
    thanks, paul-robert / the netherlands

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hmm inexplicable, save to say, Paul-Robert, that there is some damage on the the medallion and the rest could have been polished off. I have seen no evidence that Omega produced medallions without the stars. Regards Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  41. Anonymous4:39 am

    Hi Desmond. I live in CT and sent 2 watches to be repaired in FL. My tag chronometer was returned fixed, but my 2000ish Omega automatic Connie was returned as a broken 1969ish omega auto Connie. They're trying to tell me that's the watch I sent them. It doesn't even fit my wrist. What should I do? Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you have any photographs of your original watch, a serial number for the movement, or any such evidence that will identify it as yours. Also do you know anyone close who absolutely could say that the watch you received was not the watch you sent to be repaired?

      So what I suggest is that you stack up as much evidence as possible and confront them with it, also exploring if you can get the police involved.

      This is outrageous when you think of it. What was the name of the outfit in Florida?

      Regards

      Desmond

      Delete
  42. Anonymous1:43 pm

    I have a question about this watch- is this blog still active?

    ReplyDelete
  43. Anonymous3:57 am

    Hello!

    Omega –°onstellation with Pie Pan dial manufactured with caliber 571?

    Thanks and best regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,

      I'm assuming you mean, did a pie pan dial come with a calibre 751 movement? The answer to that question is no, the calibre 751 being a day-date model was featured in later designs that had flat dials. While a pie pan dial did appear in a calibre 1011 model, no day-date models ever had faceted or pie pan dials.

      I have seen on occasion Frankenwatches that have modified calibre 751s under pie pan dials however. Calibre 751 is basically a chronometer version of the calibre 550 with a day-date mechanism. As such, if one removes the day wheel and replaces the star wheel and longer finger assembly with parts from a calibre 564, amongst other things, a calibre 751 can sit under a dial meant for a calibre 561 or 564.

      If you have a watch with a cal 751 or are condsidering purchasing one that has a pie pan dial and date only, I would reconsider and walk away.

      Regards

      Desmond

      Delete
    2. Anonymous2:53 am

      Hello Desmond!

      Many thanks for your qualified information!

      The best regards,
      Niko

      Delete
  44. Desmond - I am trying to figure out how to upload pictures. Can you help?

    ReplyDelete
  45. https://www.dropbox.com/s/csj826jzbj0txcx/2015-09-30%2015.19.23.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/weewdaqr0q0rbpi/2015-09-30%2021.10.57.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/o1kfnggac3p8fcq/2015-09-30%2015.19.46.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ii062g7nprpefd5/2015-09-30%2015.19.10.jpg?dl=0

    The above watch appears to me to be in better condition that similar watches that are for sale online for $5.25K - $14K. I would like to know your estimate of value and where to sell it? Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your model is a 168.029 Constellation C shape with 'knurled bezel' and powered by a calibre 751 movement. The watch has a solid gold 'silky guilloche' dial and overall the watch presents very well. Some of the original finish of the case, by the look of it, has been polished off at some time, probably during a service.

      The watch was probably produced in the late 60s, but could have been sold early into the seventies. The serial number on the movement would confirm production year.

      The bracelet is a genuine 18k bracelet of the time and may have been chosen at time of purchase. A number of different bracelets were available to accessorise the watch head.

      There is probably around 3 ounces of pure gold in the watch (possibly a little more), being 18 karat. So today's gold price at around 1120 USD means that gold content alone amounts to around USD 3400.00 The higher the gold price, the higher the value of the watch.

      Does the bracelet have stretching links or are the links fixed? Are there any numbers stamped on the end pieces near the lugs or under the clasp?

      There are a number of different market values in the vintage watch industry: wholesale, global internet, on-line retail and bricks and mortar retail, B&M retail usually being the most expensive. The wholesale price would be around gold value plus $500, and that's the price under which one would not consider, although some shonky dealers would probably try it on to steal it from you.

      On-line retail varies significantly from around the 5k to, as you say 14k. The 14k price tag is outrageous and all I can think of is that the seller wants a buyer not only to pay for the watch but also for his children's orthodontic work as well!

      Global Internet value, that of on-line auction sites like eBay, also varies wildly. But if the watch was properly photographed, including the inner case back and movement, had been cleaned and oiled, and was accurately described (including that it is a one-owner with verifiable providence - original papers would certainly help) I think it would fetch around the 5.5 k mark. Could be a bit more if there were a few competing bidders.

      I imagine you have read my essay on the C Shape, and while the watch style certainly is less popular that say a pie pan Constellation De Luxe, there is a growing band of collectors of this watch.

      Where to sell? Possibly on Watchuseek or Purist Pro sales forums, or even eBay if you have an account.

      Hope that helps. Feel free to ask any further questions.

      Regards

      Desmond

      Delete
  46. Hello Desmond!
    (this blog still active right?)

    I found this beautiful specimen in the Web as follows http://watchlim.blogspot.co.id/2015/10/599-omega-vintage-constellation.html?m=1 .
    I kindly want to ask its originality as I found its bezel it's not the same as the one I've seen on Google, while I'm keen to buy this piece.
    Please help with any information you got, I'll definitely appreciate it.
    Thanks


    Regards
    Putra

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Run away from this watch. It is 'put-together' or what we call a Franken watch. Note the train bridge reads calibre 656 and yet the rotor bridge has the chronometer 'adjusted' etc., script.

      Calibre 565 is of course not a chronometer movement, and what I suspect is that a seller has acquired a tired old C Shape and got it going again by using parts from different movements.

      The braceletr is not an Omega bracelet, and someone has cunningly attached it to an Omega clasp.

      As I said, run away from this watch and this seller.

      Cheers

      Desmond

      Delete
    2. Read cal 565 above and not 656.

      Also note the case number which should have a cal 564 movement and be date only.

      Delete