Register of All Known Vintage Omega Constellation Models

Rare model 14382 Omega Constellation De Luxe with trenched chapter ring

About eight years ago I compiled a database of all Omega Constellation models produced during the vintage era and included a range of more contemporary models up to 2003.

Over the years I added numerous Constellation models that did not appear in the Omega Vintage Database to the extent that they now now represent around 10 percent of the total.  The database I compiled is an evolving document, and as new finds are made so the list grows.

Several document 'snatching' services on the WWW have taken it upon themselves to expropriate my work without my permission - one even going to the trouble of removing the copyright notice -  and there are few earlier versions of the document floating around in cyberspace.  

You will find the latest version of this database here

The Elusive Omega Constellation 14747

If you see an Omega Constellation model 14747 in the wild, stalk and run it down because you'll be one of the few people ever to hold this rare species in captivity.  If you find two, consider a breeding program!  If one happens to be clinging to the wrist of its custodian please use means of persuasion other than homicide to facilitate the separation process - the offering of money suggests itself as a better alternative.

I first stumbled over a pink gold-capped version of the 14747 in the mid-2000s (see picture above). Later, I encountered a stainless steel version with pink gold dial furniture and medallion in June 2008. Since then, I have seen a total of three further examples, two of which were in stainless steel.

    Pie pan  in 14747-1 case with a cal 504 movement, gold dial furniture and hands. Courtesy RonnieS

As the comparatively rare model 2887 is the screw-in case back version of the calibre 505 model 2852, so the 14747 is the screw-in contemporary of the calibre 504 powered 2493. Unlike the 2887 which encases a 29mm dial, the 14747 takes the same dial as the 2943.

I am told that the 14747 came in all metals, and while I have seen pink and yellow gold capped and stainless steel cases I am yet to catch sight of a solid gold version.  

Stainless Steel 14747-1 case with a recently refinished dial by Kirk Rich. Courtesy JohnH 

All non-solid-gold pieces feature a 14 karat gold medallion on the case back. Stainless steel models pick up the colour of the dial furniture. In the case of rhodium plated markers and hands, the medallion is yellow gold.

Only 25,000 pieces of the calibre 504 were made, the vast majority of which appeared in the press-in case back model 2943. It is a testament to the rarity of the 14747 that this model seldom, if ever, finds its way into global internet or physical auction markets. Even a search using that one trick pony, Google, will reveal little of value amongst the standard commercial detritus polluting its pages.  

Omega archives indicate that the 14747 was the replacement for the 14397, and while the 14397 does not appear in the Omega vintage database either, it was powered by the calibre 504 and had a screw-in case back too.  The 14397 pictured below is the first and only example I have seen. Interestingly, case parts (such as case backs and crystals) for the 14397 are interchangeable with case 14393 which housed the first calibre 561 model.


Model 14397 gold capped. Courtesy Hoi




A plausible explanation for the existence of the two calibre 504 screw-in versions may be that when the decision was made to move exclusively to screw-in cases with the new mid-500 series of calibres Omega designated the remaining calibre 504 inventory to be cased in the screw-in cases 14397, and soon after the 14747. 

Hence, it is perfectly acceptable to describe both the 14397 and 14747 as ‘rare’, and I’m hoping that word alone will trigger a wider search for these elusive pieces. They are out there. If you encounter one, please click the ‘About Me’ icon and send an email with pictures!



Few Can be Better than Many


Over the years I have seen countless watch enthusiasts pass through the ‘accumulation phase’ of watch collecting. With the intemperance of a flock of Gormands at an All You Can Eat smorgasbord, they sup greedily at the eBay buffet, stockpiling as many variants on their plates as means allow.  After all, more is better, and a collection isn’t a collection without numbers, right?  

Wrong. A collection can be a collection if you have more than two of something, and some of the most exquisite collections of vintage Omega Constellations I’ve seen have been in trios or quads. What makes these collections so alluring is that numbers have been substituted for quality, originality and fineness.   And, from my perspective, it is a far more astute to pay the price demanded of one fine example than outlay a similar amount of money for three also-rans.

The Omega Constellation calibre 561 model 168.005 below is offered in support the “condition over quantity” argument.  Feel free to use it as an exemplar of what you can aim for, should the notion of going for the best and leaving the rest appeal to you.


This one good piece is indeed worth three also-rans, and will continue to appreciate in value because of its fine, genuine black dial and sharp overall condition. There is little more to be done to this piece other than to restore the hour and minute hands. The crystal is genuine and has the etched laser symbol although it can't be seen in the picture. 

Notice the case has seen little wear. The facets on the lugs are sharply defined and the bezel is crisp and not rounded. The case has never suffered under a watchmaker’s polishing mop and reveals its original finish.  The watch retains its original decagonal crown and only the slightest patina appears on the dial. Black dials of this condition are decidedly uncommon and will become more so with the passing of time.

So, before you press the button, consider scrutinising a potential purchase closely. Look for signs of excessive wear on the case; examine closely the dial for condition and to assure yourself it has not been refinished, and inspect the movement to ensure signature parts are present and the movement has not suffered under the hands of amateurs.   

You can burn holes in your pockets accumulating numbers, but a couple, or even a few, top shelf Omega Constellations of the condition shown in the above example means that if things get too hot there will always be eager hands ready to relieve you of your ‘burden’........ and pay you good money for the privilege.

British Omega Constellations - Update




If you want to know anything about British cased solid gold Omega Constellations of the nineteen-fifties and sixties, there is no point asking the Omega Museum because they have not kept comprehensive records.  Instead, you are left with the option of trawling through the www and applying a  sieve to hearsay, myth and  fantasy in the hope of discovering some nuggets of fact.

Well, that certainly was the case until British collector Andrew Romaine invested time and considerable labour in producing a comprehensive review of Omega's relationship with U.K. precious metals case maker, Dennison.

Andrew has spent the past twelve months editing and up-dating his original essay. It has grown considerably, and includes new information that has come to light and additional pictures of the various Dennison Constellation models.  You can access the up-dated essay here

Andrew deserves our sincere thanks for his continued efforts in filling this knowledge gap.

These Fake Constellation 14900 - 62 SC Cases are Staying Around Like a Bad Smell


Any 14900 Omega Constellation case needs careful scrutiny because it is one of the most ubiquitous of the faked dog-leg lugged cases around. There was a bit of a lull on eBay for a while but I notice them creeping back from time to time, and It's hard to say if another batch has been shipped from the Orient or it's just the earlier ones being recycled.   Never-the-less, extreme care should be exercised.

The latest fake to surface is shown in the capture of this current eBay listing. The seller watches-n-such is also selling an appalling "homage" to a black Constellation pie pan dial, probably from the same source. In this instance, the "n-such" being sold as NOS may come back to bite watches-n-such in the posterior.

While Constellations are not the most faked vintage pieces by a long shot (Rolex models from the 60s and 70s have that dubious honour), cases 14000, 14902, 167.005 and 168.005 in stainless steel have been targeted over time.  

If you're not aware of the checks to make when assessing one of the above models for purchase, please review this essay.

The Omega Constellation Pie Pan Factoid




The Omega Constellation pie pan dial was so named because of its similarity to an up-turned pie pan. Sounds fairly plausible, doesn’t it? 

But, if something is said often enough, especially on the internet, the chances of it ultimately being perceived as fact are relatively strong.  Norman Mailer called the end products of this phenomenon “factoids”. We encounter endless factoids in the mass media where reporters report something as fact, the 'fact' suddenly goes viral, only to be debunked or corrected down the line. 

In evaluating the pie pan story for its factoid-ness, what do we find?  On inspection, does a “pie pan” dial actually look like an up-turned pie pan? Ever seen a real pie pan with twelve facets?  Most have flat bases and rounded edges, more akin to the heavily domed dials of the earliest of Constellations, do they not?  It’s fair to say that it requires a reasonable stretch of one's imaginative faculties to perceive faceted Constellation dials as pie pans. 

Secondly, much of the nomenclature of horology is in Swiss French. Its elegant form lends itself to the horological lexicon, whereas Swiss German is a rather challenging and cumbersome tongue to non-speakers. Can you imagine a twelve sided dial being described as a “zwöufsiitigs ziffreblatt”, no?  

Omega’s main operations were based in Bienne (on the border of the French speaking population) and Geneva (right in the thick of the French-speaking zone) and hence it would be perfectly natural to describe the dial as “douze pans” (translated, “twelve-sided”), which was the legitimate description of it by Omega when first released and, indeed, long after. 

As a young pre-internet watch enthusiast, I never heard the description “pie pan”, but rather heard these dials described as “twelve sided” or “faceted” dials.  But someone, somewhere, at some time, probably after the advent of the worldwide web, was responsible for transforming “douze pans” into “pie pans”, and since that defining moment the “pie pan” factoid has been repeated so often by so many that Omega now uses the term in its printed and on-line material.    

So, pie pans it is, but if you’re a horological pedant feel free to call these dials “douze pans", or if you are a fine, upstanding citizen of German-Speaking Switzerland,  "zwöufsiitigs ziffreblatt” is perfect!

A Rare Special Order Omega Constellation


Omega Constellation de Luxe models are much sought-after by collectors. (See here for a comprehensive review of all models).  A cut above ordinary 18 karat solid gold versions, they were aimed at the luxury watch-buying segment and were priced accordingly.

The Constellation de Luxe featured a solid 18 karat gold case and 18k karat solid gold dial. Some examples were housed in solid silver boxes. Beautifully wrought bracelets were on offer to accessorise the watch, mostly at point-of-sale, but occasionally fitted at the factory.

While not rare, Constellation de Luxe models were assembled in small runs when compared with overall production numbers of standard models.  The least common of all de Luxe models were those encased in 18 karat white gold, which, these days, command a premium of between fifty and a hundred percent (and often more) over their yellow gold compatriots.

White gold in the nineteen-sixties was a ‘niche’ metal, the majority of people preferring to follow the vogue for yellow gold, and this special order de Luxe 14393 18k white gold version shown below is only the second example I have encountered in many years of collecting.

It is a very special piece indeed, having been ordered for the original owner by Lambert Sundberg, an Omega dealer in Stockholm who was a friend of the family.  The watch sports an 18 karat white gold dial, a matching woven link 18 karat bracelet and a beautifully machined solid silver presentation box.


The provenance of the ensemble is indisputable. The engraving on the side corroborates the date of sale and the details of the transaction, and translated reads, “Omega bought on 9th September, 1961, from my friend Lambert Sundberg in IV Tower Block (Skyscraper) in Stokholm City” and contains the initials of the original owner “N.H.O”, the late father of the present owner, Ulf.


The special order status of the watch is revealed by the second number stamped below the model number 14393, and to own such a unique piece is every collectors dream.  Fortunately, it is much cherished  and will remain part of the family legacy.



Click on the pictures for larger views.


A French Omega Constellation 2648 Seen in the Wild


French 18 karat gold Constellations were cased in-country until the abandonment of the gold standard in the nineteen seventies, and the earliest models will always have the “Fab Suisse” (Made in Switzerland) appellation on the dial. 

I’ve seen many Seamasters and other Omega models of the nineteen-fifties with the “Fab Suisse” mark, but rarely have I encountered 1952 production, model 2648.  The first year’s production of Constellations was under eight thousand for all models, and this example with a 13 million serial number calibre 354 is rarely seen. 



While the photographs are not of the prize-winning variety, they do show a grand old Madame with an excellently preserved visage (the white spots are on the crystal and not the dial) and a case body and case back that have withstood the ravages of time.


The case back marks are correct, showing the Eagle for gold purity, the case maker’s mark, the ‘old’ Omega symbol and a case number recorded by Omega France but not documented in Switzerland. 


While most collectible in its country of origin, these extremely uncommon early French cased Constellations are more than a worthy candidate for any quality collection.

Rare Accessorised Omega Constellation De Luxe Model 2954



People throw around the term ‘rare’ with as much zeal as a Matsusaka beef connoisseur, but rarely does the nomenclature live up to the timepiece so described. The word “rare” is almost as seductive as the words “new” and “sex”. It’s one of those trigger words that causes us to bypass our critical faculties, and that’s why it’s a favourite of all kinds of snake oil salesmen and some vendors of antiques and vintage watches.

If you’ve been collecting vintage watches for any length of time, experience clicks in when your retinas register the word “rare”. Scepticism overrides the tendency to behold the watch with awe, and questions tend to surface like, “Rare, compared with what?”, “Rare, according to whom?”, and “Rare, by what standards?”

Thankfully, every now and again a vintage timepiece shows up that truly merits a description other than “decidedly uncommon”: a piece that deserves the respect and admiration that comes with a legitimate label of “rare”. The ensemble pictured is one such example, and you can see the full reveal here.

An Omega Constellation Restoration Story


It’s amazing, but understandable, how important a loving father’s watch is when bequeathed to his son. I say “loving father” because over the years I have received countless emails from recipients of their father’s watches, and they seem to fall into two broad categories. The first category is of those who express a heart-felt desire to restore and wear the watch, and the second, a heart-felt desire to know the value of the piece and how to be rid of it quickly. 

It doesn’t take too much imagination to guess which beneficiaries had a relatively happy childhood or an enduring Father-Son bond as opposed to those who would rather forget the entire experience and move on. Fortunately, I receive more correspondence from the former than the latter, revealing touching and often uplifting stories that nourish the incorrigible sentimentalist in me.

One such story began with an email from Ari in August 2011. Rather than relate the story myself,  I’d prefer to share this recent essay from the original correspondent. 

....And While We’re Talking about British Omega Constellations



There’s evidence that some British cased gold Constellations and also some imported Constellations were presented in boxes that were manufactured locally and differed from the standard Swiss issue.

Some complete watch and box ensembles for British cased and imported Constellations did follow the normal trend (illustrated in this essay on Constellation boxes), however others didn’t, and this makes it difficult to declare with any certainty which box ‘correctly’ matches a specific watch. 

The box below owned by WilfreidS came from the original owner and housed a fully imported stainless steel Constellation 14393.  The watch also came with papers, extra links and receipts - a wonderful find which gives the watch provenance and elevates its collectability.

I keep a separate record of British boxes, and if you have an example I would be delighted to receive a photograph so as to build up picture essay in the future.



An Uncommon Omega Constellation 167.5435


After a fifty year relationship with Omega U.K. Dennison was replaced as Omega’s principle precious metals case maker by David Shackman & Sons of Chesham in 1968.  Shackman continued to produce cases for Omega until the Eighties, but many cases were imported directly from Switzerland when the Gold Standard was dropped in the Seventies.

While it is not uncommon to encounter a Shackman case housing calibre 564 Constellations of the later nineteen-sixties, chancing upon a calibre 712 model 167.5435 (shown below) is a far rarer experience.


The design of the 167.5435 is based on the calibre 712 model 167.021 (167.0021 in the Omega Database) produced in Switzerland.  The 167.021 was a direct replacement of the calibre 551 powered 167.005 and catered for the growing interest in ultra-flat cases. However Omega U.K. decided to dress up its version of the case with a finely machined bezel, which elevates the design into the ‘dress watch’ or ‘Montre Bijoux’ genre quite successfully.

The model featured here and owned by AlanC was encased in the U.K. in 1969 as evidenced by the hallmarks on the inner case back. The movement was produced in late 1968 and was shipped with hands and dial to Omega U.K. The dial is 18 karat gold, another British diversion from the Swiss norm. The dial features the OM stamps at six o’clock, standing for ‘Or Massif’ and translates to ‘Solid Gold’ in English. Omega used this mark on many, but not all, solid gold dials in the later nineteen-sixties to distinguish between solid gold and other metal dials.

The addition of fancy bezel and solid gold dial continued the Constellation “De Luxe” tradition for the British market only. Few rather than many of these pieces were produced from nineteen-sixty-nine to seventy-five, making them an ideal and eminently collectible addition to any collection of British Constellations.